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CON 100 Introduction to Environmental Conservation (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the field of environmental conservation. Students are expected to improve their writing and critical thinking skills throughout the semester. Topics include current issues, management techniques, a history of the conservation movement in the U.S. as well as underlying principles of environmental conservation F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 101 Principles of Soils, Waters, Forests (3-0) 3 hrs.

To provide students with an introduction to principles of soil science, meteorology, hydrology, forestry and forest ecology. The student should gain knowledge and field experience in the conservation and management of these interrelated natural resources, especially as they apply to outdoor recreation, wildlife, fisheries, and land use planning. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 102 Introduction to Fish and Wildlife (3-0) 3 hrs.

The purpose of this course shall be to provide the student with a more complete understanding of mammalian and freshwater fisheries biology with emphasis on the ecology, identification and management of those species important to fish and wildlife managers in Western New York. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 103 Environmental Science (3-2) 4 hrs

This course investigates the interactions and relationships between humans and the Earth. It provides the scientific foundation for analyzing today’s pressing environment issues and solutions for a sustainable future. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the impact of humans on other living organisms, water resources, air quality, and energy and mineral resources. In analyzing potential solutions to these environmental issues, students will evaluate the impact of their own choices on the Earth’s resources as well as the relative role of governments in setting sustainable policies. In the laboratory component of the course, students will learn scientific methodology, sampling procedures and methods used to test environmental quality. A portion of the lab will include outdoor experiences. (Also listed as BIO 103) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 113 Wildlife Field Techniques (3-0) 3 Hrs.

This course focuses on field techniques employed by wildlife professionals. Topics include proper animal handling, various capture techniques, measuring and tagging, telemetry, camera traps, sampling protocols and basic research design. Mammal and bird techniques will be emphasized with some reptile and amphibian techniques covered as appropriate. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 116 Fisheries Techniques (3-0) 3 hrs.

This hands-on course provides students with field experiences utilizing various types of fisheries equipment. Emphasis is placed on sampling techniques for both fish and aquatic habitats. Topics include small boat operation, fish identification, fish capture and handling techniques, data collection, tagging and marking, aging, electrofishing, netting, radio telemetry, hydro acoustics, habitat assessment, and equipment maintenance. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 118 Introduction to Natural Resource Law (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course introduces students to laws for the protection and conservation of fish, wildlife and natural resources. The focus of the course is New York State and Federal law regulating the conservation of fish, wildlife and forest resources. Particular areas of study include the New York State Fish and Wildlife Law and Federal Fish and Wildlife Laws (eg: Lacey Act, Endangered Species Act, Migratory Bird Act). Students will study the evolution of the current body of New York State and Federal law relating to management of fish, wildlife and forest resources from a historical prospective. Students will also study legislative and administrative processes employed in the formation of Fish and Wildlife Laws and the functions and duties of the New York State and federal agencies charged with enforcing these laws. Instruction methods include lecture, class discussion and guest speakers. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 122 Introduction to Applied Field Techniques (2-2) 3 hrs.

Introduction to Applied Field Techniques is designed to train students in the use of standard sampling methods and equipment currently used to measure and or assess a variety of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Students will collect and analyze field data using standard protocols and present their results in a variety of ways. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 130 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (2-2) 3 hrs.

An introductory level geospatial technology course designed to introduce students to the concepts and theories of geographic information systems (GIS) and the practice of geospatial analysis. This course consists of a lecture component and a laboratory component. Students will learn to apply GIS concepts through hands-on exercises designed to explore and analyze spatial data. Students will use leading geospatial software used by numerous professions including natural resources conservation and sustainability, business management, criminal justice, and community planning. (Also listed as GIS 130.) F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 190 Conservation Field Camp (3-0) 3 hrs.

Field Camp is designed to provide one week of conservation field experiences. Emphasis will be on fish, wildlife, and forest management techniques; conservation field studies and investigations; field natural history; outdoor recreation skills; and rustic conservation construction. SU View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 200 Field Experiences in Conservation I (2-0) 2 hrs.

This course is comprised of on-line sessions that total 15 hours and at least 45 hours of individual field experiences. On-line topics include: resume writing, interview strategies, job searching, Civil Service examination preparation and identification of field experiences appropriate to the student’s career goals. Field experiences will be arranged with appropriate agencies, which may include the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, County Conservation Services, BSA Camps, National Park Service, Nature Conservancy, water treatment plants and nature centers. Field experiences will provide students the opportunity to assume the responsibilities for the jobs (Fish and Wildlife Technician, Nature Interpreter, Camp Ranger, etc.), they will be performing after graduation. The type of experience varies with student career interest and previous experience. (Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory grade.) Prerequisite: Students must complete 9 credits of CON courses prior to enrolling in this course. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 201 Field Experiences in Conservation II (2-0) 2 hrs.

This course is comprised of limited classroom sessions and 75 hours of individual field experiences. Topics in the classroom are intended to build from the material learned in CON 200 and include: resume writing, job searching and identification of field experiences appropriate to the student's career goals. Field experiences will be arranged with appropriate agencies, which may include the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, County Conservation Services, BSA Camps, National Park Service, Nature Conservancy, water treatment plants and nature centers. Field experiences will provide students the opportunity to assume the responsibilities for the jobs (Fish and Wildlife Technician, Nature Interpreter, Camp Ranger, etc.), they will be performing after graduation. The type of experience varies with student career interest and previous experience. (Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory grade.) Prerequisite: CON 200. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 202 Principles of Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology (3-0) 3 hrs.

A study of climatic, edaphic and biotic factors as they relate to species distribution and population dynamics in selected biomes of New York State and the world. Students develop deeper understanding of the ecological principles concerning the interaction between organisms and their environment. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 121, BIO 122 or BIO 251. Corequisite: CON 202L. (Also listed as BIO 221) F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 202L Principles of Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology Lab (0-2) 1 hr.

In this hands-on laboratory-based course, students will have the opportunity to conduct studies and perform experiments that enrich their knowledge and understanding of the scientific concepts learned in the lecture portion of CON 202/BIO 221 Principles of Terrestrial/Aquatic Ecology. Laboratory exercises will include a combination of field trips and observational and experimental studies as well as in-classes exercises aimed at preparing students for upper level coursework in the field of ecology (e.g. reading scientific papers, presenting data, interpreting graphs). Prerequisite: ENG 101, BIO 121 and BIO 122, or BIO 125. Corequisite: CON 202. (Also listed as BIO 221L) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 203 Seminar in Environmental Conservation (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course presents topics in the field of environmental conservation. Current topics include: Herpetology, Birds, Wildflowers, Entomology, Winter Botany, Trees, Galls and Environmental Conservation Research. A comprehensive field identification test is required. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 205 Field Botany (3-0) 3 hrs.

Field identification, taxonomy, habitat preferences, and growth characteristics of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants are the major topics covered in this course. Emphasis is placed on local flora and its utilization by man and wildlife. Important ornamental trees, New York State rare plants, introduced plants that are management problems, nonvascular plants, and the ecology of the eastern deciduous forest biome are highlighted. Considerable class time will be spent outdoors on campus and at nearby natural areas. (Also listed as BIO 250) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 210 Field Natural History (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is a series of extended field trips into a selection of local ecosystems such as gorges, bogs, streams, and marshes. Students will analyze these ecosystems both as examples of each ecological situation and as areas managed in different ways by man. Natural history topics such as insects, aquatic life, migratory birds, glacial geology, and human interactions with the environment are studied in appropriate areas. (Also listed as BIO 245) F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 214 Fisheries Management (3-0) 3 hrs.

Fisheries management stresses the relationship between humans, fish, and their environments. Students are introduced to the principles of fishery management including history, theory, and management strategies. The importance of habitat management, and population dynamics and their interactions is explored. Management strategies will be introduced through case studies of selected fisheries. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 215 Unique Ecological Communities (3-0) 3 hrs.

The purpose of this course shall be to provide students with field travel experiences relative to their course work in Natural Resources Conservation. This expedition course, to different areas of the world, will emphasize identification and natural history of birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, plants and a variety of ecological communities. Students will be provided with opportunities to observe employment options in Conservation, and gain experience in camping and group travel. Examples of travel experience include trips to: Florida Everglades and Keys, Wilderness Alaska, Costa Rica, Belize and various National Parks in the United States and Canada. WS/SU View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 216 Wildlife Management (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course will provide intensive classroom and some field experience in wildlife management theory including: population dynamics, mortality, natality and the relationship between wildlife and their habitats. Practical techniques used for aging, sexing, marking, trapping and transferring game and non-game wildlife will be presented. Rearing and releasing endangered and game species, habitat evaluation, nuisance control and wildlife population estimation techniques are discussed. Prerequisite: CON 102. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 217 Environmental Planning and Impact Analysis (3-0) 3 hrs.

This is an introductory course in the multi-disciplinary field of environmental planning. Techniques used to identify, inventory, and evaluate natural resources are examined. Local case studies, regulatory laws, and the environmental decision-making process are reviewed. Topics are developed further through assigned readings and classroom discussions. Students put concepts into use with realistic projects involving local environmental land use issues. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 218 Fish Culture Techniques (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to provide students an in depth exposure to fish culture practices and techniques. Students will review historic and current status of fish culture in the U.S and world. Culture methods, data collection, egg take, incubation, and fry hatching of walleye (Sander vitreus) cultured at the FLCC-Muller Field Station- Education and Research Center is emphasized. Trips to other culture facilities add to the student experience. Essential factors involving water quality, fish health, nutrition, species requirements, system design, equipment, and advanced re-circulation aquaculture systems are studied. This is a hands-on course. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 219 Introduction to Aquaculture (3-0) 3 hrs

This course is designed as an introduction to aquaculture practices and techniques. Students are exposed to both the historic and current status of aquaculture. Emphasis is placed on culture methods, fish handling, and data collection techniques. Walleye cultured at the FLCC-Muller Field Station, will be collected and stocked. Trips to other culture facilities will expose students to different culturing techniques. Factors of water quality, fish health and nutrition, system designs, and advances in Recirculation Aquaculture Systems (RAS) will be investigated. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 220 Glacial Geology of the Finger Lakes (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is an introduction to glaciation emphasizing historic events within the Finger Lakes region. The mechanics of glacial motion, erosion, and deposition will be studied and then used to interpret our modern landscape. Students will be introduced to the technique of air photo interpretation. Our modern biodiversity and distributional patterns of organisms will be related to postglacial events. Scenic values associated with glacial landscapes will be a focal point of the class field trips. (Also listed as SCI 220) S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 221 Conservation/Horticulture Topics I (1-0) 1hr.

This course is designed to provide students with specialization in an area related to their occupational or educational interest and to provide students the opportunity to become more familiar with conservation and horticulture practices. Topics typically involve a field component and may be held as a residential course at the Muller Field Station or the East Hill campus. (Also listed as HRT 221) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 222 Conservation/Horticulture Topics II (2-0) 2 hrs.

This course is designed to provide students with specialization in an area related to their occupational or educational interest and to provide students the opportunity to become more familiar with conservation and horticulture practices. Topics typically involve a field component and may be held as a residential course at the Muller Field Station or the East Hill campus. (Also listed as HRT 222) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 223 Conservation/Horticulture Topics III (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to provide students with specialization in an area related to their occupational or educational interest and to provide students the opportunity to become more familiar with conservation and horticulture practices. Topics typically involve a field component and may be held as a residential course at the Muller Field Station or the East Hill campus. (Also listed as HRT 223) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 224 Dendrology and Field Botany (2-0-2) 3 hrs.

Field study, identification and natural history of plant communities with an emphasis on important forest tree species. (Also listed as BIO 224) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 225 Introduction to Wildlife Diseases (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of wildlife diseases and environmental contaminants which adversely affect the health of wildlife populations. Infectious and noninfectious wildlife diseases as well as parasitology will be explored through discussion, assignments, guest speakers, and the completion of a technical research paper. Students will then be able to apply knowledge of these topics to other aspects of environmental conservation including environmental chemistry, ecology, wildlife rehabilitation, and environmental law. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 226 Fisheries Field Assessment (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is an intensive one-week session that gives the student in-depth experiences in fish inventory methods and general vessel operation and maintenance. The majority of class time will be in the field, allowing the student to gain hands-on training in fisheries management techniques. The class is divided into five daily modules. The order in which the modules are taught are weather dependent; therefore, the starting and ending times will vary. Students should plan on being available from 6 a.m. to midnight each day. (Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory grade.) SU View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 227 Applications of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) (.5-1) 1 hr.

This class will provide students with an introduction to basic theoretical concepts and practical hands-on use of global positioning systems (GPS) with strong emphasis in relation to natural resources management and data collection. (Also listed as GIS 227) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 229 Stream Ecology and Monitoring (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course provides students with an introduction to hydrology, stream ecology and sampling design. Students will intensively study aquatic macro-invertebrate identification. The students will learn through field and laboratory experiences with data collected, analysis, and production of a final professional report. Prerequisite: MAT 121, CSC 134, CSC 135. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 233 Laws for the Use and Protection of Water and Land Resources (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course focuses on Local, New York State and Federal Laws for the protection of water resources and land use. Students will study New York State Environmental Conservation Law as it relates to the management of water resources, protection of freshwater and tidal wetlands, and regulation of mining and energy exploration. Students will study the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) process and the Federal Clean Water Act, landowner rights and liabilities. Legal processes for the introduction of new laws and the enforcement of current laws will be discussed in depth. Students will be introduced to potential careers through the study of local, state and federal regulatory agencies charged with protection and wise use of water and land resources. Instruction methods include lecture, class discussion and guest speakers. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 234 Laws for the Management of Air Resources, Solid Waste and Hazardous Substances (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course focuses on New York State and Federal laws for the protection of air resources, the management of solid waste and regulation of substances harmful to the environment. Students will study the New York State Environmental Conservation Law as it relates to protection of air resources, the management, transportation and disposal of solid and hazardous waste and the use substances potentially hazardous to the environment such as pesticides. Students will also study related federal statutes including the Clean Air Act, NEPA and CLERCA. Students will be introduced to potential careers through the study of local, state and federal regulatory agencies charged with protection of air resources, the management, transportation and disposal of solid and hazardous waste and the use of substances potentially harmful to the environment. Instruction methods include lecture, class discussion and guest speakers. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 235 Wetland Science and Practice (3-0) 3 hrs.

A survey and in-depth investigation of wetland terms and types, characteristic features and processes, and delineation, management and restoration practices. The course examines wetland hydrology and biogeochemical processes as well biotic adaptations to wetland environments. An emphasis is placed on achieving competency in recognizing the hydrophytic vegetation and hydric soil indicators commonly encountered in the non-tidal, freshwater wetlands of northeastern United States. The culmination of the course is an experiential project that applies this field-based knowledge with GIS resources to delineate a wetland on a local site according to current government standards. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 236 Wetland Mammals (3-0) 3 Hrs.

This residential course will be held at the Muller Field Station over two weekends plus two additional class meetings. The focus of the course will be the natural history, research and management of four wetland mammals: beaver, muskrat, mink and river otter. Students will design and conduct a field study. Students will be required to stay at the Muller Field Station for the two weekends as some field work is done in the late evenings and early mornings, rain or shine. Students will be required to canoe. Prerequisite: CON 102. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 237 Black Bear Management I (1-0) 1 Hrs.

Course covers the identification, natural history and management of black bears in North America with special emphasis on New York State. Students who enroll in this course are also expected to take CON 238 Black Bear Management II the following semester. Prerequisite: CON 102. F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 238 Black Bear Management II (2-0) 2 Hrs.

Course covers the research, natural history and management of black bears in North America with special emphasis on New York State. Students may have the opportunity to participate in hands on black bear management activities. Students who enroll in this course are expected to be able to devote several full weekdays to conduct field work over the course of the semester. An additional original project is undertaken by the class. Prerequisite: CON 237 or permission of instructor. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 239 Introduction to Ecological Management Practices (2-2) 3 hrs.

This hands-on, techniques course provides students the opportunity to gain first-hand experience conducting standard practices in managing habitats. This includes but is not limited to erosion control, vegetation management, invasive species control, and ecological restoration techniques. This course will emphasize current practices in the design, implementation, monitoring, and maintenance of a variety of natural and managed environments. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 240 Wildlife Crime Scene Investigation & Forensics (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course introduces the student to the study of criminal investigative techniques and the analysis of evidence with an emphasis on crimes against wildlife and the environment. The focus throughout the course will be the collection, protection and preservation of evidence as it relates to the investigative process. Analysis of actual closed criminal cases and simulations with mock crime scenes will allow students to put into practice classroom discussions and readings. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 242 Field Study of Birds (3-0) 3 Hrs.

This course provides students the opportunity to identify and study birds in the field. Emphasis is placed on birds of New York State. Topics include identifying birds by sight and sound, capture and handling techniques, banding, field study methods such as breeding bird atlas, waterfowl counts, nestbox surveys and hawk counts. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 243 Introduction to Sustainable Forest Management (3-0) 3 hrs.

Introduction to Sustainable Forest Management is a course that provides an introduction to past forestry practices as well as current trends in silviculture and sustainable forestry. The course explores the multitude of ecological and societal values that forests provide and are managed for. This course also emphasizes the importance of the myriad of natural factors affecting forest ecosystem health including soils, climate, topography, ecological succession, as well as both abiotic and biotic disturbances. The effect of past management on current local forest condition will also be examined. (Also listed as FOR 243) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 244 Introduction to Forest Measurements (2-2) 3 hrs.

Introduction to Forest Measurements is a course designed to train students in the use of forest measuring equipment and the implementation of standard forest measuring procedures. Some of the topics covered include: basic tree identification, forest resource sampling designs, individual and stand level density and volume estimation techniques, as well as growth and yield models. The course is strongly based on field activities. (Also listed as FOR 244) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 246 Limnology (3-2) 3 hrs.

An introduction to the scientific study of inland waters, limnology concerns itself with all the factors that affect living populations within those waters. Through lecture and field experiences, the student will become familiar with physical and chemical processes in water, especially those that have a direct effect on biological organisms. Standard methods and highly technical instrumentation will be used on board the college’s educational vessel. A survey of life forms and identification skills will be emphasized as well as aquatic community structure and interactions. (Also listed as BIO 246) F View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 255 Wildland Fire Suppression (S-130/S-190) (2-0) 2 hrs.

This course provides the training necessary for the Federal Interagency “RED” Card for wildland firefighter. Topics covered include: ignition, behavior, and spread of wildfires; the role of topography and fuels in wildfires; prescribed fires as a management tool; use of fire suppression equipment; methods of fire prevention and suppression; State and Federal wildland fire control agencies. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Also listed as WFS 130) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 256 Fire Ecology (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course is designed to give students an appreciation and understanding of the ecological role of fire in a variety of North American ecosystems. Advantageous adaptations of species inhabiting fire prone ecosystems will be discussed. The effects of fire on plants and animals will be discussed within the context of ecological time scales. The effect of past state and federal policies concerning wild fire will be examined using various case studies. Students will also be introduced to the use of prescribed burning as a habitat restoration technique. (Also listed as WFS 256) S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 260 Principles & Techniques of Nature Interpretation (3-0) 3 hrs

This course presents an in-depth investigation and practice of the fundamental principles and concepts of nature interpretation. Historical development, current trends, methods and field techniques in nature study, outdoor education, interpretive programming and facilities will be examined. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


CON 265 Field Techniques for Naturalists and Photographers (3-0) 3 hrs.

An introductory course emphasizing basic field techniques that are used in outdoor photography. Special emphasis will be placed on field techniques for photographing wildlife, plants, landscapes, outdoor recreation and environmental activities. The course will also place special emphasis on the use of natural light to produce quality photographs. A lesser emphasis will be placed on photographic equipment, film types and methods of utilizing photographs. Restricted to Conservation and Horticulture Majors. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


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